Theodore Géricault Drawings

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Fig 1 The Artist’s Left Hand (1824, watercolor, with black and red chalk, 9×113⁄5) by Théodore Géricault
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Fig 2 Theodore Gericault, Cannibalism, 1818, Black chalk, ink wash, watercolor and white gouache on light brown paper
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Fig 3 Theodore Gericault, Cannibalism, 1818, Black chalk, ink wash, watercolor and white gouache on light brown paper

I find these drawings so inspriational, I get a lot from the different use of media to capture form, light and tone. I like the different marks (expression within the sea) and that the drawing contour lines are still evident. Looking at the two drawings of the raft of Medusa the main focal point has been highlighted assumingly with the white gouche. Compsitionaly both drawings have a centrally focused composition with a clear foreground middle and background. What is really intersing is that no detail has been lost and the marks are really interesting made by both watercolour (Sea) and fine chalk that convey hair and objects.

I am more naturally drawn to the blue grey tone/colour palette and wondering how to translate this into a green/ bright spring landscape?

Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault 1791-1824 was one of the pioneers of the romantic movement. He used the bright contrast and tonal values through use of tonal wash and line to work out his compositions and to convey form. There is an abundance of paintings of severed heads and anatomical studies which depict the artists time spent reviewing the human form.

 

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